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Arabella Mast

Technology, Software and Supplies for the Family Historian

The Ancestor Shop is a premier genealogy supply store for those young in spirit. Here you’ll find the best up-to-date electronics as well as the traditional supplies that support our passion in honoring our ancestors. Check out the useful free blog posts that will be available in the center column on genealogy tips and tricks too. It will have many new reviews of the “best of the best” family tree resources. Here’s to Genealogy. Enjoy. Enjoy.
Linda Coate, D.B.A.


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The Hidden Half of the Family: A Sourcebook for Women’s Genealogy

By law and by custom women's individual identities have been subsumed by those of their husbands. For centuries women were not allowed to own real estate in their own name, sign a deed, devise a will, or enter into contracts, and even their citizenship and their position as head of household have been in doubt. Finding women in traditional genealogical record sources, therefore, presents the researcher with a unique challenge, for census records, wills, land records, pension records–the conventional sources of genealogical identification–all have to be viewed in a different perspective if we are to establish the genealogical identity of our female ancestors.
Whether listed under their maiden names, married names, patronymic/matronymic surnames or some other permutation, or hidden under such terms as "Mrs.," "Mistress," "goodwife," "wife of," or even "daughter of," it is clear that women are hard to find. But while women may never be as easy to locate as their male counterparts, Christina Schaefer here pioneers an approach to the problem that just might set genealogy on its head! And her solution is simplicity itself: Look closely at those areas where the female ancestor interacts with the government and the legal system, she advises, where law, precedent, and even custom mandate the unequivocal identification of all parties, male and female. According to this thesis, the legal status of women at any point in time is the key to unraveling the identity of the female ancestor, and therefore this work highlights those laws, both federal and state, that indicate when a woman could own real estate in her own name, devise a will, enter into contracts, and so on. The first part of the book–a lengthy and informative introduction–deals with the special ways women are dealt with in federal records such as immigration records, passports, naturalization records, census enumerations, land records, military records, and records dealing with minorities. All such records are discussed with reference to their impact on women, as are a group of miscellaneous, non-governmental records, including newspapers, cemetery records, city directories, church records, and state laws covering common law marriages and marriage and divorce registration.
The bulk of this absorbing new reference work, however, deals with the individual states, showing how their laws, records, and resources can be used in determining female identity. Each state section begins with a time line of events, i.e. important dates in the state's history, following which is a detailed listing of eight key categories of information: (1) Marriage and Divorce (marriage and divorce laws and where to find marriage and divorce records); (2) Property and Inheritance (women's legal status in a state as reflected in statute law, code, and legislative acts); (3) Suffrage (information as to when any voting rights were granted prior to the ratification of the 19th Amendment in 1920); (4) Citizenship (dates when residents of an area became U.S. citizens); (5) Census Information (special notes on searching federal, state, and territorial enumerations); (6) Other (information on welfare, pensions, and other laws affecting women); (7) Bibliography (books and articles relating to women in the state, historical and biographical sources, and publications regarding legal history and jurisprudence); and (8) Selected Resources for Women's History (addresses of state archives, historical societies, and libraries; women's studies programs, women's history programs, and more). This engrossing new work is as amazing as it is informative: amazing because it shows how women have been written out of genealogical history; informative because it demonstrates how their identities can be recovered. This is a new and promising path in genealogy, suggesting fruitful avenues of research and many new possibilities.

Trace Your Roots with DNA: Using Genetic Tests to Explore Your Family Tree

Written by two of the country's top genealogists, this authoritative book is the first to explain how new and groundbreaking genetic testing can help you research your ancestry

According to American Demographics, 113 million Americans have begun to trace their roots, making genealogy the second most popular hobby in the country (after gardening). Enthusiasts clamor for new information from dozens of subscription-based websites, email newsletters, and magazines devoted to the subject. For these eager roots-seekers looking to take their searches to the next level, DNA testing is the answer.
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Genealogy 101: How to Trace Your Family’s History and Heritage (National Genealogical Society Guides)

A recent Maritz Poll reported that 60% of Americans are interested in their family history. And with good reason. Through genealogy, you can go back into history to meet people who have had more influence on your life than any others — your ancestors. And the better you get to know your ancestors, the better you will get to know yourself: the who's and what's and why's of you.
Barbara Renick, a nationally-known lecturer on genealogy, tells the uninitiated researcher the steps needed to find out who their ancestors really were, and brings together for even the more experienced genealogical researchers the important principles and practices. She covers such topics as the importance of staying organized and how to go about it; where and how to look for information in libraries, historical societies, and on the internet; recognizing that just because something is in print doesn't mean it's right; and how to prepare to visit the home where your ancestors lived.
Genealogy 101 is the first book to read when you want to discover who your ancestors were, where they lived, and what they did.

Death of a Headmistress (Janet Burney Genealogy Novellas)

Death of a Headmistress is a Janet Burney novella. (17,000 words.)

Janet Burney, a more-or-less retired private investigator, has been helping Grace Harding, headmistress emerita of Glendower School, research her family history. Just as Dr. Harding is about to learn the answer to a genealogical question she's been working on for three years, she commits suicide.
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Lineage book of the charter members of the Daughters of the American Revolution

Lineage book of the charter members of the Daughters of the American Revolution. 364 Pages.

Genealogy at a Glance: Irish Genealogy Research

Building on years of experience, Irish genealogy expert Brian Mitchell tells you succinctly about the sources used in Irish research, where to find them, and how to use them.

In a few deft sentences he provides all the basic instruction you need, focusing on key record sources and materials for further reference, and finishing with a summing up of record repositories and online sources. From emigration lists and surname histories to church registers and census records–each accompanied with important background information–he very cleverly lays out the whole of Irish genealogical research, providing what is arguably the best four pages ever written on the subject.
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Deadly Pedigree: A Nick Herald Genealogical Mystery

Mystery, genealogy, murder! Climbing Louisiana family trees can be deadly. Nick Herald, a professional genealogist working in New Orleans, searches for possible Louisiana relatives of a lonely Holocaust survivor. After the shocking murder of the elderly man who was his client, Nick fears that something much more sinister than innocent genealogical curiosity lurks in the shadows. He must find the truth! What buried secrets haunt the present? To find out, Nick warily navigates a dangerous forest of mysteries with roots in Jewish and African American tribulations and triumphs. His investigation delves deeply into the unique history and complex ethnic gumbo of Louisiana. He struggles to unravel a tangled tale of betrayal, bigotry, lust, shame, and love spanning oceans and continents and two centuries of Louisiana’s past, back to the Civil War, slavery days, and beyond. Ultimately, Nick makes courageous decisions to right old wrongs and expose the guilty, while fighting desperately to outsmart his foes, stay alive, and save all that he holds dear!

Start & Run a Personal History Business: Get Paid to Research Family Ancestry and Write Memoirs (Start and Run A)

Anyone interested in genealogy, personal history and memoirs can turn their passion into a business. Communities, families, and even corporations are increasingly seeking out professional writers and historians to record their stories. For anyone who is interested in personal history and writing, this is an essential resource for turning your passion into an income source. Written by experienced personal historian and entrepreneur Jennifer Campbell, it covers topics such as: how to actually do the work, starting up, education and training, marketing and expansion. All books in the Self-Counsel Press Start & Run series are written in clear language and includes a CD-ROM packed with resources and templates to help you get started. This CD-ROM includes: a template for a first project, a sample business plan, a sample marketing plan, links to associations and online resources, examples of personal history research – and more!

On the Genealogy of Morals and Ecce Homo, Edited with Commentary by Walter Kaufmann

Genealogy and Ethnicity: How to Interpret the Clues

Genealogy and Ethnicy: How To Interpret the Clues, is an essential guide to the often asked question, "What is my next step?" Johari Ade has given the reader valuable information on how to extract clues from various documents, and once extracted, how to further your research with the information found. The reader learns valuable details about how to use the census to determine how various ethnic groups were listed on the census over the years, and how to use political history to find your particular ethnic group. Within the book, the author provides a sample of over sixty questions that might be asked in an oral interview and assists the reader by providing actual copies of useful documents that might be encountered during one's research. This is a helpful guide for both beginners, just learning how to trace their family tree and for "seasoned" researchers who are wondering how to get through a brick wall. This book is the result by many requests from readers of the author's first book, "Ten Generations of Bondage: Eleven Generations of Faith. Both books are currently available for purchase on amazon.com or through your favorite bookstore.