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Arabella Mast

Technology, Software and Supplies for the Family Historian

The Ancestor Shop is a premier genealogy supply store for those young in spirit. Here you’ll find the best up-to-date electronics as well as the traditional supplies that support our passion in honoring our ancestors. Check out the useful free blog posts that will be available in the center column on genealogy tips and tricks too. It will have many new reviews of the “best of the best” family tree resources. Here’s to Genealogy. Enjoy. Enjoy.
Linda Coate, D.B.A.


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The Birth of Tragedy & The Genealogy of Morals

Skillful, sophisticated translations of two of Nietzsche's essential works about the conflict between the moral and aesthetic approaches to life, the impact of Christianity on human values, the meaning of science, the contrast between the Apollonian and Dionysian spirits, and other themes central to his thinking.

Genealogy QuickSteps

Step-by-Step, Full-Color Graphics!
Get started researching your family tree right away—the QuickSteps way. Color screenshots and images with clear instructions show you how. Discover the fascinating story of your ancestors using a wide array of resources, including websites, private and public archives, military records, blogs, social media networks, computer programs, and more. You’ll also get advice on getting around roadblocks, collaborating with family members and fellow researchers, and organizing, personalizing, and publishing your family tree history.
Use these handy guideposts: Shortcuts for accomplishing common tasks Need-to-know facts in concise narrative Helpful reminders or alternate ways of doing things Bonus information related to the topic being covered Errors and pitfalls to avoid
Screenshots with callouts show and explain exactly what you’ll see on your computer screen while you’re doing a task

The unique, landscape-oriented layout of the QuickSteps series mimics your computer screen, displays graphics and explanations side by side, and lays flat so you can easily refer to the book while working on your computer.

Highland Roots

HIGHLAND ROOTS is the real story of one Highland cottage through Scotland’s turbulent history.

It is a blend of history, archaeology, estate records, literature and legend too. It includes a lot of original quotes that give a genuine flavour of the times. But it also tries to get beneath the skin of history, to imagine how it would feel if we were transported back to these times. Sitting in the remains of the Iron Age homestead on a glorious summer evening or a wet winter day, 2000-year-old ghosts can still send shivers down your spine.
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Genealogy at a Glance: African American Genealogy Research

Nothing will get you going faster in African American genealogical research than this Genealogy at a Glance& publication. In just four pages, Michael Hait, author of the popular CD The Family History Research Toolkit, lays out the basic elements of African American research, boiling the subject down to its essence and allowing you to grasp the fundamentals of African American research at a glance.

Hait explains that there are three imperatives in African American genealogical research: (1) you must begin with interviews of family members; (2) you must check records of birth, marriage, and death; and (3) you must check federal census records, especially the crucial 1870 census, which was the first census to include information on former slaves.

A Genealogy of Literary Multiculturalism

As an anthropology student studying with Franz Boas, Zora Neale Hurston recorded African American folklore in rural central Florida, studied hoodoo in New Orleans and voodoo in Haiti, talked with the last ex-slave to survive the Middle Passage, and collected music from Jamaica. Her ethnographic work would serve as the basis for her novels and other writings in which she shaped a vision of African American Southern rural folk culture articulated through an antiracist concept of culture championed by Boas: culture as plural, relative, and long-lived. Meanwhile, a very different antiracist model of culture learned from Robert Park's sociology allowed Richard Wright to imagine African American culture in terms of severed traditions, marginal consciousness, and generation gaps.

In A Genealogy of Literary Multiculturalism, Christopher Douglas uncovers the largely unacknowledged role played by ideas from sociology and anthropology in nourishing the politics and forms of minority writers from diverse backgrounds. Douglas divides the history of multicultural writing in the United States into three periods. The first, which spans the 1920s and 1930s, features minority writers such as Hurston and D'Arcy McNickle, who were indebted to the work of Boas and his attempts to detach culture from race.
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How to Use FindAGrave.com for Genealogy Research

Using grave websites, such as Findagrave.com, can help you further your genealogy research. You will find information that you may not have seen before, having a hard time finding, and find more ancestors.

Genealogies of Virginia Families from the William and Mary College Quarterly: Family Archives

About 500 genealogies reference over 100,000 individuals including substantial number of Bible records with alphabetical index. Virginia Gleanings contains abstracts of 17th and 18th century English wills and administrations relating to Virginia and Virginians.

Family History: A Complete Guide to Tracing your Ancestry

A comprehensive introductory guide to tracing your family history and building your family tree. It introduces you to genealogy, explaining the main records you are likely to find along your journey and will show you how to get started.

The book then introduces you to several different genealogical records and provides information about what they are, what information they contain and where you can find them.
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The Hidden Half of the Family: A Sourcebook for Women’s Genealogy

By law and by custom women's individual identities have been subsumed by those of their husbands. For centuries women were not allowed to own real estate in their own name, sign a deed, devise a will, or enter into contracts, and even their citizenship and their position as head of household have been in doubt. Finding women in traditional genealogical record sources, therefore, presents the researcher with a unique challenge, for census records, wills, land records, pension records–the conventional sources of genealogical identification–all have to be viewed in a different perspective if we are to establish the genealogical identity of our female ancestors.
Whether listed under their maiden names, married names, patronymic/matronymic surnames or some other permutation, or hidden under such terms as "Mrs.," "Mistress," "goodwife," "wife of," or even "daughter of," it is clear that women are hard to find. But while women may never be as easy to locate as their male counterparts, Christina Schaefer here pioneers an approach to the problem that just might set genealogy on its head! And her solution is simplicity itself: Look closely at those areas where the female ancestor interacts with the government and the legal system, she advises, where law, precedent, and even custom mandate the unequivocal identification of all parties, male and female. According to this thesis, the legal status of women at any point in time is the key to unraveling the identity of the female ancestor, and therefore this work highlights those laws, both federal and state, that indicate when a woman could own real estate in her own name, devise a will, enter into contracts, and so on. The first part of the book–a lengthy and informative introduction–deals with the special ways women are dealt with in federal records such as immigration records, passports, naturalization records, census enumerations, land records, military records, and records dealing with minorities. All such records are discussed with reference to their impact on women, as are a group of miscellaneous, non-governmental records, including newspapers, cemetery records, city directories, church records, and state laws covering common law marriages and marriage and divorce registration.
The bulk of this absorbing new reference work, however, deals with the individual states, showing how their laws, records, and resources can be used in determining female identity. Each state section begins with a time line of events, i.e. important dates in the state's history, following which is a detailed listing of eight key categories of information: (1) Marriage and Divorce (marriage and divorce laws and where to find marriage and divorce records); (2) Property and Inheritance (women's legal status in a state as reflected in statute law, code, and legislative acts); (3) Suffrage (information as to when any voting rights were granted prior to the ratification of the 19th Amendment in 1920); (4) Citizenship (dates when residents of an area became U.S. citizens); (5) Census Information (special notes on searching federal, state, and territorial enumerations); (6) Other (information on welfare, pensions, and other laws affecting women); (7) Bibliography (books and articles relating to women in the state, historical and biographical sources, and publications regarding legal history and jurisprudence); and (8) Selected Resources for Women's History (addresses of state archives, historical societies, and libraries; women's studies programs, women's history programs, and more). This engrossing new work is as amazing as it is informative: amazing because it shows how women have been written out of genealogical history; informative because it demonstrates how their identities can be recovered. This is a new and promising path in genealogy, suggesting fruitful avenues of research and many new possibilities.

Trace Your Roots with DNA: Using Genetic Tests to Explore Your Family Tree

Written by two of the country's top genealogists, this authoritative book is the first to explain how new and groundbreaking genetic testing can help you research your ancestry

According to American Demographics, 113 million Americans have begun to trace their roots, making genealogy the second most popular hobby in the country (after gardening). Enthusiasts clamor for new information from dozens of subscription-based websites, email newsletters, and magazines devoted to the subject. For these eager roots-seekers looking to take their searches to the next level, DNA testing is the answer.
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